Markt Entwicklerstudios, Publishers und ihre Kuriositäten.

Nullpointer

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miperco

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Ich packs mal hier rein. Schreier hat (mal wieder) einen super Artikel geschrieben. Diesmal über die Entwicklung von Anthem. Holy shit...

 

Nullpointer

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Muss ja klasse dort die letzten 12 Monate gewesen sein

They talk a lot about the six-year development time, but really the core gameplay loop, the story, and all the missions in the game were made in the last 12 to 16 months because of that lack of vision and total lack of leadership across the board
it felt like the entire game was basically built in the last six to nine months. You couldn’t play it. There was nothing there. It was just this crazy final rush. The hard part is, how do you make a decision when there’s no game? There’s nothing to play. So yeah, you’re going to keep questioning yourself.
Einerseits ganz schlimm. Andererseits auch ein krasses Achievement, so ein Spiel in weniger als einem Jahr zu erstellen.
 

miko

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Ich nehme es mal vorweg: mimimimi kotaku mimimimi
joa die antwort von bioware selbst war ziemlich dämlich. haben den artikel nicht einmal gelesen.
http://blog.bioware.com/2019/04/02/anthem-game-development/



The press is not your enemy, BioWare

Kotaku reporter Jason Schreier published a detailed, damning report about what went wrong with BioWare’s Anthem. The piece describes a work environment that has become so stressful that multiple developers have had to take weeks, and sometimes months, off for “stress leave.”

BioWare responded before the report was published with a terse statement that doesn’t dispute the details in Kotaku’s report. However, the response does awkwardly conclude with a wag of the finger at the press for shining a light on the studio’s problems.

If the takeaway for BioWare’s leadership is that the press shouldn’t hold them accountable, then they perhaps haven’t learned from the game’s tumultuous development.
https://www.polygon.com/2019/4/2/18292304/bioware-press-response-anthem
 

Valcyrion

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Wobei ich mich hier Frage wie weit EA Schuld ist.
Die Engine war klar EAs Bock.

Der Rest ?


Hatte Bioware wirklich so viele Jahre nichts richtiges gemacht und Koppflos wie auch ohne Konzept Geld verschwendet staune ich sogar ab der Geduld von EA...

Rockstar hat in der selben Zeit RDR2 realisiert.

Das EA aber ein Idiotenverein ist, geschenkt ;)
 

verplant80

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Die Entwicklungskosten führen halt zu einem massiven Problem.

Du zahlst jahrelang für hunderte von Mitarbeiter und wenn sich das Spiel dann nicht verkauft, dann ist das Studio direkt am Abgrund. Nächstes Spiel dann wieder 3 Jahre Entwicklung mit „ja, vielleicht klappt es ja dieses Mal“?!?

Im Prinzip funktioniert das Ganze wirklich nur über größere Publisher, die duzende Studios haben und dann solche Ausfälle ausgleichen können. Aber wenn dann ein Totalausfall nach dem anderen kommt, dann ist irgendwie auch klar, dass man irgendwann den Stecker ziehen muss.
 

miko

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How Fortnite’s success led to months of intense crunch at Epic Games

https://www.polygon.com/2019/4/23/18507750/fortnite-work-crunch-epic-games
“One senior guy would say, ‘Just get more bodies.’ That’s what the contractors were called: bodies. And then when we’re done with them, we can just dispose of them. They can be replaced with fresh people who don’t have the toxic nature of being disgruntled.”
GaaS ist quasi unendlich langer crunch und studios, die da nicht mitmachen, verlieren schnell wieder ihren rückenwind, weil gamer dann unzufrieden sind, weils nicht gut genug unterstützt wird. siehe aktuell apex legends bei ea, wo sowas wie crunch nicht unterstützt wird und nun wieder enorm an popularität verloren hat.
 

Tien

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How Fortnite’s success led to months of intense crunch at Epic Games

https://www.polygon.com/2019/4/23/18507750/fortnite-work-crunch-epic-games


GaaS ist quasi unendlich langer crunch und studios, die da nicht mitmachen, verlieren schnell wieder ihren rückenwind, weil gamer dann unzufrieden sind, weils nicht gut genug unterstützt wird. siehe aktuell apex legends bei ea, wo sowas wie crunch nicht unterstützt wird und nun wieder enorm an popularität verloren hat.
Bei Apex Legends war halt schnell die Luft raus, daher verständlich, dass die Spielerzahl massiv abflaut (wie ich es vorhergesagt habe) und das Spiel bei Twitch nun fast dauerhaft hinter PUBG liegt, was ja laut Expertenmeinungen hier ständig tot ist.
 

Radianc3

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Das online Gaming ist im Moment im Umbruch.

Die neuen Erfolgsrezepte sind
Live Events, Lootboxen, Staffeln, Communityarbeit, Streamingzahlen, Virales Marketing.

Wer da nicht mithält wird nicht Erfolg haben.
Auch wenn du so ein renommiertes Studio wie Bungie bist.
 

miperco

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One Friday afternoon a few weeks ago, the developers at Treyarch held a happy hour event to welcome the summer interns. There was pizza, beer, and jubilation for everyone at the studio behind Call of Duty: Black Ops 4—except the quality assurance testers, who had to leave shortly after they got there.
“QA was told we were only allowed down at the party for a max of 20 minutes, and we ‘really shouldn’t drink anything’ because we still had to work,” said one tester. “It sucks, but honestly we’re pretty used to getting these sort of ‘rules’ when they do any parties here.”



It was a small affront, but it felt indicative of a bigger problem: At Treyarch, many contract employees, especially the testers, say they feel like second-class citizens. Testers work on the second floor of the office, while most of the other developers are on the first. Some testers say they’re told not to speak to developers in other departments, and one told me they’ll only do so surreptitiously, out of fear of getting fired. When they get to work, testers have to park their cars in a different parking lot than other employees, one that’s further away from the office. When lunch is catered, testers are told that the food downstairs is for the development team, not for them. Sometimes, they’re allowed to scrounge for leftovers an hour later, once the non-testing staff have gotten to eat.
Put another way: When I asked a non-tester at Treyarch about the party, they responded, “Surprised they were invited at all.”
Call of Duty: Black Ops 4, released last October, is the latest entry in Activision’s massively popular first-person shooter series. It made more than $500 million in its first three days on sale, helping ensure that Activision’s 2018 financial results were what chief executive Bobby Kotick called “the best in our history.” It was also a turbulent production, marked by a drastic reboot, the last-minute addition of a battle royale mode, and what one developer described as “perpetual crunch” that perhaps hit the QA team hardest. Many of Treyarch’s employees are not full-time staff but contractors, which means that, among other things, they don’t qualify for the bonuses that full-timers might get from all those Black Ops 4 sales.
According to Glassdoor aggregates and testimonials from employees to Kotaku, Treyarch’s QA testers are paid a base wage of around $13 an hour. For the past year or so, some say they’ve been working around 70 hours a week. So it was a gut punch to at least a few of them when, in January of this year, news broke that the video game publisher Activision had given a cash and stock bonus worth up to $15 million to its new chief financial officer, Dennis Durkin. They didn’t even qualify for a $15 bonus.
“That broke a lot of people,” said a tester who left shortly afterwards. “We’re getting paid these very minimal amounts working these ridiculous hours, yet these people are getting paid absurd amounts of money. It’s just a culture of not being cared about.”
This account of Treyarch’s studio culture, and of the development of Call of Duty: Black Ops 4, is based on interviews with 11 current and former staff members, all of whom spoke anonymously in order to protect their careers. They described a company in which contractors, and particularly testers, feel like they’re perceived and treated as inferior. Throughout Black Ops 4’s rocky development, testers said they worked under unfair conditions—a theme that’s common in the video game industry, but one that remains worth scrutinizing. Those who spoke to us for this story said they did so because they hope that public pressure will lead the studio to change.
Alter Falter...
 
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