La Pucelle Tactics

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Red

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Nachdem das Strategiespiel Disgaea: Hour of Darkness weltweit Erfolge verbuchen durfte, kommen die Fans hierzulande dank Koei im Mai auch endlich in Genuss des mit Awards überhäuften Spektakels. In Amerika hingegen freuen sich die Spieler mit La Pucelle: Tactics bereits auf ein weiteres Spiel des Teams von Nippon Ichi. Da nicht auszuschließen ist, dass auch La Pucelle nach Europa kommen wird (entsprechenden Erfolg von Disgaea vorausgesetzt), könnt ihr euch mit dem neuen Trailer schon einmal einstimmen.

http://www.4players.de/rendersite.p...fec11c806ac9cfddd4b641125d339&DOWNLOADID=6280
Quelle: 4players
 

Red

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La Pucelle: Tactics Hands-On Impressions And Movies

If you were a fan of Disgaea: Hour of Darkness, then you undoubtedly know the name of Nippon Ichi Software. The fine folks at that company, with the release of that title, introduced US gamers to a unique and challenging turn-based tactical title that featured not only engaging gameplay, but also one heck of a bizarre yet endearing story. Well, they’re back once again, along with Mastiff, with La Pucelle: Tactics, a game in the same vein as Disgaea. While the game contains much of the same action that made Disgaea such a hit with tactical RPG fans, it also features a host of new features that help to create a more definitive and engrossing title.



The story in La Pucelle: Tactics opens in the small town of Port Au Feu, with the three characters of Prier, Culotte, and Alouette setting off to slay some demons. The world in which they live in is bound by the legend of the Maid of Light, a legendary figure that in the past battled the evil Dark Prince, an entity determined to shroud the world in eternal darkness. Supposedly, the Maid fought the Dark Prince in an epic battle, but throughout the years, the actual outcome of the battle still remains a mystery. In response to the evil hordes of the Dark Prince, the Church of the Holy Maiden was constructed. The Church enlists the help of special demon hunters whose sole task in life is to combat “lost souls,” or those who have died and had their spirits taken off by malevolent spirits. Prier, Culotte, and Alouette are three such fighters. But, for all their heart and desire to fight, Prier and Culotte are still rookies, learning the ropes of fighting monsters and the world around them.



After some brief character introductions and tomfoolery, you set off into the world of La Pucelle: Tactics and get a crash course in the ways of combat and moving about the world map. All navigation in the game takes place either through a large and expansive world map or through more localized settings, like towns or buildings. While in a town, you’re pretty limited in your range of motion, as the game follows a pretty straight two dimensional system that only really allows you to move to the left or right. As you move (left or right), you can talk to people that may be in your path or enter any buildings that may be in your vicinity. The world map functions in an entirely different way and is comprised of location points that you can choose to enter. You’ll find all sorts of points on the map, but in the beginning of the game, you’ll mostly be limited to points for your hometown of Port Au Feu and the tutorial levels. As you beat levels, more points will open on the map and you’ll be able to further your exploration.



Entering a dungeon quickly introduces you to both the look and feel of what combat and exploration is comprised of in the game. Each dungeon is divided amongst a number of different rooms, with each one having enemies and specific goals. As you beat a room, you’ll be given the choice of whether to continue on and challenge another room, or go back to the World Map to either resurrect fallen characters or save your game. Thankfully, the system of shuffling between dungeons and the World Map is both useful and intuitive. You see, once one of your characters dies in battle, the only way to bring him back into the action is to travel back to the World Map. Also, doing so will completely heal all of your other party members. After taking care of your business of healing and saving, you’ll then be able to jump back into whatever dungeon you were in as well as be able to travel right back to the last room that you played through. While it is a nice feature, and one that makes you carefully weigh your options at all times in regards to your strength and what may lie ahead of you, it did get a bit cumbersome having to repeat the process after every single fight. A quick-save option would have been a nice addition and would have helped keep the action going at a nice clip, rather than having to break everything up after each room.



The combat system in La Pucelle: Tactics is derived quite a bit from Disgaea. The action on-screen is all turn based and you’ll be moving your characters around the “room” board during the course of a fight, either trying to gain better ground on an enemy or positioning yourself to take less damage from an attack. When a round begins, you start your turn off by placing your characters on the board and moving them a limited number of spaces amount of. When a character moves into close range of an enemy, you can attack them. Attacks can also be combined with other characters, so you’ll be able to tackle some of the more difficult monsters with the full strength of your entire party if you wish. Enemies, however, will pull this move, too, so don’t be surprised when a large group of baddies pull up to you and attack you in large numbers. Outside of regular attacks, characters also have special abilities, ranging from things like being able to heal their allies to unleashing super-powerful attacks.



While much of what you would expect from a turn-based tactical game is present and accounted for, the game throws in some interesting features that help keep things fresh and expand the combat into new realms. First of all, scattered throughout boards are things called Dark Portals. Dark Portals are mysterious wells that ooze Dark power in a pre-determined direction on the board. The catch about the portals is the fact that when you place a character in its path and change what direction they’re facing you can alter the flow of the power. Dark Portals can either be purified to destroy them, or actually used to damage enemies. You see, if you leave the portals untouched for too long, they’ll eventually spawn in more enemies, which is a pain to deal with. By purifying the portal, you can effectively close it off. But, once you do purify it, any enemies caught in the path of the flow of power will be damaged. Think of it as a sort of “chain reaction” system for taking out multiple enemies at once. The longer the power flow, the more damage it will ultimately dole out to any unfortunate enemies who may be in its path. If you string together a portal attack that spans more than 15 board squares, you’ll unleash a Miracle Attack, a powerful summon-like move that will usually clear out whatever bad guys may be in its way.



The purify system also works on regular enemies. Much of the draw of Disgaea was centered on the fact that you could enlist enemy soldiers into your ranks. Well, with the purify ability that each character possesses, you can essentially do the same thing. When in close proximity to an enemy, casting purify on it will cause it to lean more and more towards siding with you. The more purifications you perform, the higher the chance that it will defect when you finally defeat it. It’s a neat feature and I found myself trying to purify every single thing that I came across. And, as you progress further into the game, you’ll ultimately realize that having a healthy amount of converts in your reserves is absolutely necessary for some of the more difficult fights. The only catch is that the more of one particular enemy unit that you have in your group, the more difficult it becomes to actually convert more of them during the course of a battle.



Visually, the game features some nice “cutesy” graphics that are pretty reminiscent of Disgaea. While nothing in the title is going to cause your PS2 to overload and melt, the look and feel of the game feels good enough. Characters models are probably the low-point of the visuals and are pretty lacking in detail, not to mention in actual animations. But, aside from their clunky nature, the game’s look helps to create an almost animated look to the overall package.



The sound in the game had me scratching my head in puzzlement. While the game does feature some pretty funny voice-over work, especially for attack sequences and victories, they’re repeated way too often. And, the music seems like it was taken straight from some bizarre big top circus.



Overall, La Pucelle: Tactics should give any Disgaea fan plenty to have fun with. The new Dark Portal system helps to create some truly strategic gameplay and the storyline, while a bit goofy at times, it’s still enjoyable. While the game doesn’t feature mind-blowing graphics or award-winning CG sequences, the tactical gameplay more than makes up for that.


-Chris Cook
http://www.gameinformer.com/Images/downloads/movies/lapucelle/pucelle-1.mpg

http://www.gameinformer.com/Images/downloads/movies/lapucelle/pucelle-2.mpg

Rechts klick Ziel speichern unter!!!

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Red

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http://www.gameinformer.com/News/Media/Media.htm?CS_pid={3877F6F4-33B0-41EE-9607-C9BC1391476E}
 

jacksmith

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La Pucelle: Tactics, released in Japan La Pucelle: Legend of Light is a tactical role of women in the PlayStation 2 game developed by Nippon Ichi Software. It released in Japan in January 2002, and the 2004 North American Mastiff maijā.Spēle received port on the PlayStation Portable in Japan on November 26, 2009, titled La Pucelle Ragnarok.
 
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